Nov,2021

4 Types of Transformational Coaching Methods That Empower Clients

Transformational coaching started before it got its name. Some attribute transformational coaching to the 1980’s life coach, Thomas Leonard. Meanwhile, others say it didn’t start until the early 2000s after the release of Jack Mezierow’s Transformational Learning Theory. Regardless of the origin, transformational coaching has taken off and is growing in popularity.

While transformational instruction has yet to reach the height of its movement, it’s already challenging previous coaching models. Therefore, as a coach, or mentor, you can’t afford to delay learning about this technique. This blog will help you understand transformational coaching so you can decide how to apply it to your business model.

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What is Transformational Coaching?

Transformational coaching is a self-actualization process that focuses on helping individuals grow into who they want to become. Coaches who practice this technique analyze thoughts, beliefs, perceptions, and cultural influencers that impact growth mindsets. This practice aims to empower individuals to grow, overcome their limiting beliefs, and rewrite their self-narratives.

While transformational coaching still involves goal-setting and objectives, neither the goals nor the objectives are the primary focus. Instead, the goals provide context to the transformation. Meanwhile, the transformation lies in the process of becoming who it is you need to be. Therefore, transformational coaching is the process of becoming who it is you need to be to reach your goals.

Transformational vs. Transactional Coaching

Transformational coaching is different from transactional coaching. Transactional coaching is often goal-oriented or based on a situation. Someone has a challenge, and a coach works with clients towards a solution. For example, if you feel stuck in your career, a transactional coach might help you figure out a new job path.

Transformational coaching, on the other hand, focuses on empowerment. A transformational coach would challenge you to think of who you need to become to succeed in life. For example, if you feel stuck in your career, a transformational coach might encourage you to think outside of the parameters of what you’re already doing.

Types of Transformational Coaches and How to Become Each

Now that you have an idea of what a transformational coach is, let’s look at the different transformational coaching categories. Life coaches, wealth coaches, health coaches, and even wellness coaches all can serve as transformational coaches. However, transitioning from a transactional coach to a transformational one might take some getting used to. Luckily, we’ve written out how you can become each type of transformational coach. We’ve also included examples of our favorite transformational coaches below.

1. Transformational Life Coach

Transformational life coaches help people navigate moments of change by encouraging them to find and identify with their most authentic selves. Many of these coaches have certifications or backgrounds that address emotional and mental needs.

These instructors often use short sessions to guide individuals wholistically towards their authenticity. Some mentors also offer group coaching to help people with similar issues connect. Often, the goal is for life coaching clients to reprogram their way of thinking.

How to Become A Transformational Life Coach

Gaining a life coach certification is a wonderful way to establish yourself as an official instructor. The Transformation Academy offers several niche-based courses you can take. From there, the Certified Training Alliance, Institute for Professional Excellence In Coaching, and Certified Life Coaching Institute are a few programs you can pursue. We discuss these more in our blog: 4 Challenges and Solutions to Becoming A Successful Life Coach.

Aside from certifications, developing your brand and working with a mentor can also help you become a transitional life coach. Building your brand helps you establish credibility in the life coaching space. Meanwhile, mentors help you gain knowledge and hold you accountable to your goals.

Example of A Transformational Life Coach

TEDx speaker and marine life activist Farrah Smith is a life coach whose taking her strategies to a new level. Farrah is a certified life coach and CIJ instructor for kids and teens. She uses positive thinking to encourage individuals to live more monumental and meaningful life.

Since working with us to give her TEDx talk this summer, Farrah’s client reach has boomed. Farrah’s goal is to teach people how to get better results in everything they do. She does this by liberating them from their limiting self-perceptions and awakening them to their potential.

2. Transformational Wealth Coach

A transformational wealth coach is someone who helps individuals understand and reframe their relationship with finances and money. Wealth coaches look at the value people place on money and the impact it has on people’s lives. For example, they might sit a family down and navigate finances, offer legacy planning, help with money communication, etc.

Transformational wealth coaches take things a step further. They refer to a client’s past money relationship to determine its effects on their present financial behavior. For example, if someone didn’t have money in the past, they might like to spend it as soon as they get it in the present. Meanwhile, someone who grew up with money and family planning might save more.

How to Become A Transformational Wealth Coach

Consider the impact both financial certifications and psychology courses have in transformational wealth coaching. Education can help you equip clients with the information they need to succeed. However, psychology and emotional learning workshops can help you reframe your client’s thoughts about money.

Encourage clients to think about their values and what matters to them most. This type of deeper level thinking often helps individuals reprioritize and feel more prosperous. That’s because you can have wealth in things that aren’t money. The goal is to encourage your clients to let go of beliefs that are no longer serving them so they can live happier and more fulfilled lives.

Example of A Transformational Wealth Coach

Moneeka Sawyer is a wealth coach who helps women strategize, organize and implement wealth planning tactics. Moneeka’s coaching program inspires her clients to have fun, take action, and achieve massive success. One of her clients even said, “Run, don’t walk, to take Moneeka’s program. You will get so much more than you ever anticipated.”

Moneekay dedicates herself to helping women transform their lives one wealth management and fulfilled life initiative at a time. Her story of how she built a multi-million dollar real estate empire on only 5-10 hours per month inspires her clients to take action.

3. Transformational Health Coach

A transformational wealth coach is someone who helps individuals understand and reframe their relationship with finances and money. Wealth coaches look at the value people place on money and the impact it has on people’s lives. For example, they might sit a family down and navigate finances, offer legacy planning, help with money communication, etc.

Transformational wealth coaches take things a step further. They refer to a client’s past money relationship to determine its effects on their present financial behavior. For example, if someone didn’t have money in the past, they might like to spend it as soon as they get it in the present. Meanwhile, someone who grew up with money and family planning might save more.

How to Become A Transformational Health Coach

Certified coach training is a significant first step towards becoming a transformational health coach. The Institute of Transformational Nutrition offers the following health coaching certifications: Autoimmune Specialist Certification, Certified Transformational Nutrition Coach, and Institute of Transformational Nutrition. These cost anywhere from $7,000 to $8,000 per program.

Once you’ve gained a certification, consider how you can layer elements of life coaching into your health practice. While general health coaches often use behavior modification and strategies to help clients establish long-term health, you can take things a step further. Instead of focusing initially on changing your client’s actions, get to the root of the problem. Help clients discover how they perceive themselves concerning their health. Is their perception hindering them from making lasting change?

How to Become A Transformational Health Coach

Cynthia Thurlow is an excellent example of a transformational health coach. She worked in clinical medicine for 20 years until she decided to shift to coaching. One area of focus of her is the root cause of chronic health issues. Her deep dive into chronic health issues led to advanced training and research on intermediate fasting, holistic health, and nutrition.

The two-time TEDx speaker now has a health coaching program that empowers women to live vibrant, healthy lives through nutrition and holistic healing.

4. Transformational Health Coach vs. Wellness Coach

A transformational health coach is different than a wellness coach. While a health coach focuses on physical transformation, a wellness coach goes more in-depth on personal living. For example, you might see a health coach if you’re trying to lose weight, navigate a chronic illness, or break unhealthy habits. Meanwhile, a wellness coach might tap into how weight gain affects emotional health or stress management.

Health coaches focus on physical wellbeing; while, wellness coaches aim to improve someone’s overall living condition. To do that, a wellness coach covers physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual prosperity.

The Transformational Coaching Model

One of the most common transformational coaching models is the RISE technique. This approach focuses on four categories that lead to heightened self-actualization: Realization, Identification, Source & Siege, and Empowerment. The client starts in the Realization phase and completes transformational coaching when they reach Empowerment.

RISE Transformational Coaching Model
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1. Realization

The famous phrase, “The first step is admitting you have a problem,” has been quoted in global self-help books and programs. It’s so common that this phrase is a part of several modern-day coaching and therapy practices. The Realization phase of transformational coaching utilizes admittance as a way for individuals to discover the limiting negative beliefs that hinder them from achieving success. There are two components of the realization phase coaches can utilize to help individuals move forward:

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Identiy Limiting Language

Languages used in daily conversations are indicators of self-beliefs. Overgeneralizations, labeling, and blaming are all types of limiting conversation barriers. This limiting language chart can help your clients track and record limiting language so you can help them achieve success.

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Acknowledge Self-Talk

Encourage the individual to become more aware of the language they use to express themselves. Make a note of limiting language and the emotional triggers associated with it.

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2. Identification

The identification step of transformational coaching is where you help your client thoroughly identify a limiting belief. This phase aims to propel a client’s self-awareness by encouraging them to align their discoveries with their desired outcome.

There is a basic human need to protect ourselves against situations that cause us discomfort. That protectiveness forms our limiting beliefs. Utilize questions and answers to articulate limiting beliefs.

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3. Source & Siege

This step is where clients find the source of their limiting beliefs. The goal is to siege and stop the negative influence that belief has on their life. Encourage your client to trace the limiting belief to an event, emotion, or circumstance where the belief began. This journey helps you and the client identify why the belief exists in the first place.

Once someone identifies the source of their belief, encourage them to look at how that belief affects their present and future. A guide by The Universal Coach Institute titled 10 Questions To Challenge Limiting Beliefs can help. This guide pinpoints a client’s limiting belief, tracks how it started, and identifies how to cut it off.

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4. Empowerment

Empowerment is the final step in the transformational coaching model. Once someone identifies and cuts off their limiting beliefs, they replace the old belief with new, empowering ones.

The goal of this step is to help your client discover affirming beliefs that encourage success. Identify new opportunities, available resources, and support groups that help your client solidify the new belief. Encourage the client to utilize these resources and perspectives daily until the new motivation and belief become routine.

Why Transformational Coaching Is The Way of The Future

According to Dr. Bina Patel of Transformational Paradigms, Millennials are swift thinkers and will rely on transformational leaders as a safety net to optimally make informed decisions. Therefore, as more Millenials and Gen Zers look to coaching programs, the expectation for transformational methods will only increase.

Transformational coaching empowers clients to be the change they want to see in the world. This coincides with modern-day trends of holistic living. Instead of coaching individuals towards a goal or technique, you can empower individuals to look within themselves and become the change they want to see in the world.

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Joelle Cullimore
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